Battle of the Planets

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Imagine a Star Trek plot with Power Rangers characters, scored by a hodge-podge of John Williams sound-alikes and late ’60s sounds influenced by bands such as Procol Harum, and voiced by Casey Kasem?

The answer is Battle of the Planets

My son asked me what were my favorite shows when I was his age. There were so few options compared to now, but I recalled Sesame Street, The Electric Company, Crusader Cat and Minute Mouse, Zoom, 321 Contact, Bugs Bunny and the other Looney Tunes shows, Rocky and Bullwinkle, Kroft Superstars (Land of the Lost and the other ones), The Banana Splits, The New Zoo Revue.

When I was older I loved Battlestar Galactica, Buck Rogers, The Greatest American Hero, the A-Team.

But the show I was absolutely obsessed with when I was his age was “Battle of the Planets”. I even wrote and drew what would now be called fan fiction in my own comic book version of the show that I called “Battle of the Stars”.

The show had Japanese animation and was a mishmash of Star Wars, Star Trek, and Japanese shows such as Power Rangers and Voltron.

A drawback to the show is the odd addition of the robot making oddly romantic comments about the one girl character. I think they go over the heads of my kids, but it’s jarring.

The plots and themes are complex, as though originally written for a different show and then shoehorned into a kids show. Or maybe the bar was higher for kids in the 70s.

DVDs are hard to find. But they’re all on YouTube.

Wikipedia has a lot of information (of course they do!)

Scamp to the Rescue

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This book may not be in print any longer and it’s easy to see why since the theme of kidnapping is no longer one you see in children’s books.

This is the story of the four puppies belonging to Lady and the Tramp: Scamp, a rascally energetic boy, and his three well-behaved sisters. Scamp is always getting into trouble until one day his sisters are dog-napped by an evil man and woman. He would have been as well, but was off getting into trouble. He managed to find them, rescue them, and escort them home, where he is ultimately forgiven.

We currently live in an era of children’s media, exemplified by shows such as Daniel Tiger, where there is no evil, where all characters are well-behaved and generally pleasant to each other. This is good for young kids, but as they get older, they become fascinated by themes such as violence and sinister intentions. Our oldest also can relate to Scamp, as someone who has so much energy that he often gets into trouble, and it’s appealing to have a story where that character is redeemed.