Scamp to the Rescue

Price: Check on Amazon

This book may not be in print any longer and it’s easy to see why since the theme of kidnapping is no longer one you see in children’s books.

This is the story of the four puppies belonging to Lady and the Tramp: Scamp, a rascally energetic boy, and his three well-behaved sisters. Scamp is always getting into trouble until one day his sisters are dog-napped by an evil man and woman. He would have been as well, but was off getting into trouble. He managed to find them, rescue them, and escort them home, where he is ultimately forgiven.

We currently live in an era of children’s media, exemplified by shows such as Daniel Tiger, where there is no evil, where all characters are well-behaved and generally pleasant to each other. This is good for young kids, but as they get older, they become fascinated by themes such as violence and sinister intentions. Our oldest also can relate to Scamp, as someone who has so much energy that he often gets into trouble, and it’s appealing to have a story where that character is redeemed.

Lambert the Sheepish Lion

Price: Out of stock

This is a book version of a 1952 Disney short directed by Jack Hannah (not the same Hannah as Hanna-Barbera) and written by Bill Peet, who went on to write dozens of children’s books (all of which are still in print) including Kermit the Hermit (1965) and The Ant and the Elephant (1972).

Lambert is loosely based on the Grimm’s fairy tale, “The Wolf and the Seven Young Kids” and tells the story of a lion raised by sheep, who feels different all his life, until one day he has a chance to be a hero.

The theme is similar to Rudolph the Red-nosed Reindeer, where a trait that makes the main character feel excluded turns out to be valuable. But this story has a bit more appeal to my kids, who see Rudolph as a bit of a wimp, while Lambert is obviously powerful and only needs to tap into his latent ability.

I sometimes hesitate with books from the 1950s since they are often more violent than I would like, but this one is pretty tame, other than some head-butting.

Moana

I’m normally a pretty cynical person, but I thought Moana was just great. Great story, great music, great everything.

(The executive producer was John Lasseter, who produced and/or wrote/driected most of the great Pixar movies before and after the Disney purchase, which may have something to do with the quality)

It is not a typical Disney princess movie, and in fact some of the dialogue pokes fun at that idea. The story is of a Polynesian girl who finds a demi-god (smug strongman and shape-shifter, Maui) and together they go on a fantastic adventure full of very original characters and scenes, with a very entertaining musical number by Jemaine Clement (of Flight of the Conchords) as a giant crab.

Fun for parents and kids alike, boys and girls.

The songs are catchy and tuneful, written by Opetaia Foa’i, Mark Mancina, and Lin-Manuel Miranda, and manage to maintain the balance between sounding authentically Polynesian and contemporary. The songs and the beautiful animation made me pine for Hawai’i.

There is also, of course, the obligatory themed Lego set: