My big train book

This is the only book that we have three copies of, one at home and one at each of the kids’ grandfathers’ houses. There’s not much to it, just a bunch of pictures of trains. There is no story, but it’s a book the kids seem to enjoy reading with their grandfathers.

Simply going through the pages, identifying the trains, seems to lead to story telling and good bonding.

I like vegetables

This is a board book about vegetables (obviously) and opposites (above/below, inside/outside, etc.) and also has textures on the pages that the kids can feel.

It’s a simple book but one of the popular ones. Our 4-year-old even pulls it out sometimes.

The Color Kittens by Margaret Wise Brown

This was my dad’s favorite book when he was a kid, but I didn’t know it until I happened to see it among a set of Little Golden Books at the grocery store.

Little Golden Books were a big part of my childhood but lately the brand has been diminished a bit since they now let just about any story be published with that distinctive gold spine. But the classics are still worth reading and still appeal to modern kids.

This is now one of my favorites as well. Margaret Wise Brown has such a distinctive rhythm and this may be her best work. The words on each page dance. Perhaps my favorite page in any book is this one:

“And suddenly Brush woke up and Hush woke up.
It was morning.
They crawled out of bed into a big bright world.
The sky was wild with sunshine”

The illustrations are also lovely and strange. Just a wonderful book.

Flip-Track Mountain

We got this used and it may be ‘out of print’ now. It was an enormous hit with our two-year-old and remained so until he was 4 or 5. The tracks don’t fit with any of the other track-based toys we have, and some of the plastic fittings have gotten worn over the years, but we keep it in a plastic tub in the attic and pull it down every now and then for the kids to play with.

The tracks are patterned as road on one side and train rails on the other, so you can flip them depending on whether you want to drive a car or a train. Seems trivial as an adult, but it appeals to young kids.

And most of the fun is in putting it together, rather than actually playing with it. It’s essentially a 3D puzzle that the child assembles, with the trick being how to get the track to loop around and reconnect with itself.

Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown

Price: $6.52
Was: $8.99

This is a strange book and I can’t understand why it’s a classic, but it is. We got multiple copies as gifts when the kids were born, and we got a bit of a nostalgia rush when we looked at it for the first time since we were kids ourselves. But I don’t think the kids liked it much. I don’t recall them ever asking for it when we read stories at bedtime.

Margaret Wise Brown has a unique voice and her rhythm is evident in Goodnight Moon, but this is not one of her best. Yet, it seems every American kid needs to know it.

Green Eggs and Ham by Dr. Seuss

Price: $8.88
Was: $9.99

This book is a classic, and an essential book for some children who are beginning to learn how to read. It’s fun for parents and children to read together, but I got tired of reading it after the tenth or so time. It reminds me of the song, “The 12 Days of Christmas” in that there is a mountain of words you have to climb over to get to the end.